Dino Sock Puppet Workshop

What’s a T-Rex’s favourite number? Eight (ate!) And yes, that’s the same number my son is at. For his 8th birthday he asked for a Dinosaur-themed party.  He decided on a crafts and cupcakes party in his school.  So today I will share with you the Dino sock puppets that he and his friends created during the workshop that I facilitated for his class.

Here are the steps in pictures:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The socks were pre-sewn and most of the embellishments had sticky backs. Other embellishments had to be adhered (like spikes, pompoms, etc) using a hot glue gun. The kids would come to us and the teacher and I were the only ones allowed to handle the hot glue gun. So we did that part for them while they waited.

Craft Supplies Buffet

Here is the craft supplies buffet table. Each of the kids got a tray and then they picked socks and embellishment for their Dino puppet.

Here are the puppets my son and his classmates handcrafted during his birthday crafting workshop:

Click on image to enlarge.

It was so much fun for all of us… and to add to the birthday fun here are some dinosaur jokes. Here’s to some ROARing laughter for you folks!

Q: Can you name 10 dinosaurs in 10 seconds?
A: Yes, 8 Iguanadons and 2 Stegasaurus.

Q: What do you call a dinosaur that never gives up?
A: Try and try and try and try-ceratops

Q: Why can’t you hear a pterodactyl using the bathroom?
A: Because the ‘p’ is silent

Q: What do you call it when a dinosaur gets in a car accident?
A: Tyrannasaurus wreck!

Q: What do you call a dinosaur with an extensive vocabulary?
A: a thesaurus.

DINO JOKES Source: www.jokes4us.com


PRINTS CHARMING 3: The Textured Plate

I bring you the the last of the 3 part printmaking workshop series that I recently conducted at my son’s elementary school – Monoprinting with a Textured *Plate.
(*a surface upon which a printing process is carried out)

Materials needed:
textured materials like silicon trivets, bubble wrap, plastic mats, plastic fruits trays with raised textured patterns
watercolor paper or card stock (plain index card works perfectly fine, too)
watercolor, tempera or acrylic paint
water dish
heart-shaped plastic

Here are the steps in photos:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you figure out a registration system for your printmaking process then it will be much easier for you to do more stuff to your print. Example, after this step, allow paint to dry then go back and print more design over that heart.

2- texture plate

Monoprint using a trivet and watercolor

Here are some of the hearts created by the young printmakers (6 to 7 year olds) at the workshop – absolutely stunning work!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

heart poster

A Parade of Hearts for your folks. Happy Valentine’s…from our hearts to yours!



We continue with our  PRINTS CHARMING series.This time we will use a Foam Plate.
Yes, foam, but not just any foam. What I find to be the best one as mono printing *plate is the material used in foam take out containers.  So, please next time you get those foam food boxes or containers… clean it and save it for a day of printing fun. (*Plate- a surface upon which a printing process is carried out)

Materials needed:
Ballpoint pen for making impression on foam
printing ink
cardstock or watercolor paper
watercolor, tempera or acrylic colors for background color on paper
inking plate (plexiglass)
rubber brayer

Here are some images of the steps:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Here are some photos of my students foam plates ( impressions on the foam were made using a ballpoint pen)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

So to make the prints more interesting, I got the kids to paint the paper using watercolor. When watercolor dried, we then did the printing with the foam plate and printing ink.
Look at this slideshow of all the works of my young printmakers…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Paint your paper and then do the actual monoprint with foam plate and black printing ink.

DSCF7151 2

Notice the letters on the foam plate are on reverse…


Make a lovely monoprint to frame or some mini monoprints to make bookmarks for your loved ones this Valentine’s.

Try out this simple monoprinting technique…if my 6 and 7 year old students could do it, so can you!!!


I recently conducted a special workshop series at my son’s elementary school on simple ways children could do *monoprinting.
*Monoprinting – is a form of printmaking that has lines or images that can only be made once, unlike most printmaking, where there are multiple originals

I called the series PRINTS CHARMING and here are the techniques that I taught them in 3 different sessions.
Workshop 1-  Making Monoprints using a Foil Plate
Workshop 2- Making Monoprints using  a Foam Plate
Workshop 3- Making Monoprints using a Textured Plate
(*Plate- a surface upon which a printing process is carried out)

Let’s start with the first session PRINTS CHARMING 1: The Foil Plate
Yes, you heard that right…foil, as in aluminum foil. So, please next time you have some used foil, clean it and save it for a day of printing fun.

Materials needed:  aluminum foil mounted on something sturdy like cardboard or plexi-glass, tempera or acrylic paint, brushes, water dish and water color paper or plain index card works too…

Here are some images of the steps:


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Check out the photos of my eager young participants at work…


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And here are the awesome creations of my little printmakers…


Try out this simple monoprinting technique and create lovely one-of-a-kind Valentine’s cards for the dearest people in your life.Cover 1 copy




Virtue Journal and Hand Lettering Workshop

We are happy to share with you some photos and details of the latest sustainable expressive arts workshop at the MoNA, facilitated by Edna Lee of the Psychology Volunteers on Bikes.

Virtue Journal Making and Hand Lettering were the focus of the recent workshop. Below are the materials used.

Tools Needed:

  • Two-hole Punch
  • 12 different beautiful printed papers such as origami and printed card stock;  recycled magazine pages and wrapping paper would also be nice (to use as month dividers)
  • 1 sheet plain or corrugated craft foam (to use as journal cover)
  • Different coloured markers


This slideshow requires JavaScript.


1. Choose a colored craft foam cover (letter-size/short size)

2. Choose 12 different beautiful printed paper (like origami paper)  to use as dividers for the 12 months

3. Get 26 sheets of letter-size (short) bond paper/printer paper and cut in half horizontally

4. Fold foam cover horizontally and put 4 sheets of  the cut bond paper for each month and put one sheet of printed paper (48 sheets total)

5. Punch, fasten and cut edges sticking out

6. The first four pages are for hand lettering practice.
(At the workshop, the alphabet was written in script on the board and samples of different types of hand lettering  were providedo for every table- —letters embellished with curls, shading, dots, strips, spaces)

8. Write your name on the  inside of the front cover using a combination of hand lettering styles.

9. Write the name of the month on each of the printed paper dividers.

10. Choose one virtue/value you want to reflect on for each month. Use hand lettering to write it on each divider.
(At the workshop, the participants were asked to suggest the virtues they would like to work on. They made a list on the board, and they chose 12, one for each month).
Examples of VIRTUES:  Respect, Generosity, Industry, Joy, Helpfulness, Love, Care, Simplicity, Fairness, Happiness, Obedience, Sincerity


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Here are some of the skills developed through the workshop: 

1. DIY – Constructing things helped develop confidence
2. Hand Lettering– Opportunity to improve one’s handwriting and be creative
3. 12 Virtues in Focus– An Invitation to challenge oneself to improve throughout the year

With their newly handcrafted VIRTUE JOURNAL, the participants are tasked to:
Reflect on the following every week:

  • How did I manifest the virtue this week?
  • What can i do to learn this virtue?
  •  List your behavior or manifestation of the virtue in focus

Handcrafted VIRTUE JOURNALS created at the MoNA Workshop


The participants proudly holding their handcrafted VIRTUE JOURNALS

We hope that this workshop will inspire you to make your own VIRTUE JOURNAL and aspire to better yourself this new year 2018.

Here is a set of virtues of the great Benjamin Franklin.


Image from the envole.net blog

Repurposed Tarps

Happy New Year to all of you from your friends at the Museum of Naïve Art [MoNA] in Cebu.

Recently, the MoNA, in cooperation with the Psychology Volunteers on Bikes (Psych Vols), organized a workshop for women and children in difficult situations. It was a simple activity with a very important message – what society might perceive as trash can still be repurposed and revitalized.

The project:  Turning old tarpaulin banners into useful book bags and day packs (workshop concept and facilitation by Edna Lee of Psych Vols)

collage 1- at work

Three simple steps: 1)cut the tarp, 2)sew with running or blanket stitch, 3) attach strap

collage 2- finished products

Pretty good for first attempt at reused/repurposed tarp bags

collage 3- duo

Check out their handmade DAY PACKS

collage 3- group

Proudly handmade –book bags, day packs, grocery bags!

Christmas Homemade Clay Ornaments 2

We continue with Part 2 of  our Christmas Homemade Clay Ornaments feature here on MoNA. We started with a variety of shapes. Here goes – you can focus on just one ornament shape. You can make all Christmas trees for example.

xmas tree

Make your homemade clay and use Christmas tree cookie cutter…

painting christmas tree ornaments

With just red, white, and green paint the kids were able to create some interesting designs…

trees after painting

Here are the painted trees…

the painted trees

And here they are —ready to hang with beautiful Christmasy baker’s twine…

When I did this Christmas crafting activity in my son’s grade 2 class I brought my ukulele and taught them the song Oh Christmas Tree. Here are the lyrics:

Oh Christmas Tree

Oh Christmas Tree, Oh  Christmas tree,
You stand in splendid beauty.

Oh Christmas Tree, O  Christmas tree,
You stand in splendid beauty.

Your branches green in summer’s glow
And evergreen in winter’s snow.

Oh Christmas Tree, Oh  Christmas tree,
You stand in splendid beauty.

Watch video on youtube

I also found a more meaningful version of the song that would be suitable for older kids or adults.. (try out the chords on your ukulele)

oh xmas tree chords

Lyrics and chords from Tabs by Ultimate Guitar

“O Christmas tree, your beauty green will teach me that hope and love will ever be the way to joy and peace for me…”

Christmas Homemade Clay Ornaments 1

Here is a Christmas project that I did with my son’s class. It all started in our kitchen with homemade clay using a recipe I found on Tips from a Typical Mom.

Homemade Clay recipe

Here are some photos from our kitchen while my 7 year old son and I prepared the homemade clay.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Allow to cool and let the Christmas painting fun begin!!!


Here are the ornaments painted by my son and his classmates…

9- classroom tree

They now hang on the cardboard tree I made for their class.

Wanna make this tree? It’s easy.  Just cut cardboard, paint and put a strip of of wood in the back of the tree  for support.  I drilled a hole on top of that wood strip so I could put string through for hanging. To hang the ornaments, use a roundhead paper fastener.

Spread the Christmas spirit — make your personalized clay ornaments in your home, classroom, or workplace… if my little boy and his classmates could do this project so can you.

A Beary Fun Workshop

It is with great pleasure that we share with you our most recent workshop “Beary Fun”, which took place last Saturday, Nov 25th.  The project concept and materials were prepared by  Zed Lee of the Psychology Volunteers on Bikes (Psych Vols)  while the actual workshop was facilitated by Edna Lee also of Psych Vols, and another regular MoNA volunteer Wae Seon Yun.

The workshop participants were women and children in difficult situations.

A pattern, some old jeans material and a set of instructions were provided by Zed Lee. Here are the steps:

First Step: Trace pattern on the underside of fabric.

Second Step: Sew along tracing – using running or back stitch to create the Teddy bear shape inside out.  Leave about 3 inches open/unstitched to give you room to insert filling/stuffing (preferably on the side of belly or top of the bear’s head)

Third Step: Give about 1/2 inch allowance and cut around the tracing/stitching

Fourth Step: Now bring the pattern side to the outside by pulling it through the 3 inch opening.

Fifth Step: Stuff your bear and stitch up the opening (slip stitch)

Sixth Step: Embellish/dress -up your Teddy Bear with buttons, patterned fabric and laces. You may also add extra details using a sharpie or acrylic paint.

Final Step: Hug your Teddy Bear and share its story with the group.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Here are the girls with their Teddy Bears…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Fun groupings of the Teddies…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Everybody gets the chance to share their stories…


You can tell from our volunteer Wae Seon’s face how much she enjoyed the BEARY FUN workshop..


Here’s a group photo of the Teddies…


Here’s a group photo of the Teddies and their creators. Photo also shows facilitators Edna Lee and Wae Seon Yun

Special thanks to Zed Lee, Wae Seon Yun and Edna Lee, the Psychology Volunteers on Bikes, West Gorordo Hotel and My Refuge House.

“You really don’t have to be young to find a friend in a teddy bear.”
-Rachel Newman

“There’s just something about a Teddy Bear that’s impossible to explain. When you hold one in your arms, you get a feeling of love, comfort and security. It’s almost supernatural.”
-James Ownby

“Teddy bears don’t need hearts as they are already stuffed with love.”

Quotes from I Love Teddies


Kyoto Journal feature

We are happy to share that Paulina Constancia’s “Pedalling for Change” art series (which is permanently housed at the Museum of Bicycling in Cebu) is featured in the current issue of the Kyoto Journal (KJ) (Issue #89, Oct-Dec 2017) . KJ is a quarterly publication circulated in Japan and around Asia.

The 6 page article in the Kyoto Journal’s issue No. 89  is “an interview with “Psychology Volunteers on Bikes” founders Edna Lee and Mishka Watin, from Cebu, the Philippines, on taking a permaculture approach to more enlightened urban planning”.

kyoto journal feature

Learn more about Tindak Sugbo and the Museum of Bicycling (MoB).